Patterson Multi House Compound on 118+ Acres

Patterson Multi House Compound on 118+ Acre Preserve with Private Lake. Unique opportunity 3 Custom Built homes plus Caretaker's house and 83 acres undeveloped land. #58 Custom Lindel House with 4 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths, and Water Views. 3000 sq ft. 10 acres #43 Contemporary 5 Bedrooms, 3.2 Bath, 4976 sq ft. 4.29 acres #46 Colonial 4 Bedrooms, 3.2 Bath, 3897 sq ft, 10.18 acres, #429 Ice Pond caretakers cottage, 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath 1676 sq ft 2.1 acres #12 vacant land 83 acres.

Patterson Multi House Compound on 118+ Acre Preserve with Private Lake. Unique opportunity 3 Custom Built homes plus Caretaker’s house and 83 acres undeveloped land. #58 Custom Lindel House with 4 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths, and Water Views. 3000 sq ft. 10 acres #43 Contemporary 5 Bedrooms, 3.2 Bath, 4976 sq ft. 4.29 acres #46 Colonial 4 Bedrooms, 3.2 Bath, 3897 sq ft, 10.18 acres, #429 Ice Pond caretakers cottage, 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath 1676 sq ft 2.1 acres #12 vacant land 83 acres.

Patterson Multi House Compound on 118+ Acres

The area which makes up Putnam County was purchased from the Wappinger Indians by two Dutch speculators in 1691 for a “competent sum of money”. The deed from the Indians to the Dutch traders conveyed a tract of land which embraced the western part of Putnam County. Six years later the Dutch traders sold the land to Adolph Philipse, the son of an extremely wealthy merchant, and the land became known as the Philipse Patent. After Adolph Philipse purchased the land, he then obtained the proper patent from the British Governor of the Province of New York. This patent included all the land to the Connecticut border. Adolph Philipse then obtained a new deed from the Indians in order to confirm his ownership in this additional land. In 1765 the Wappingers Indians challenged his patent but both the Provincial New York and English courts denied their claims.

The town was first settled around 1720 in The Oblong, which was a disputed area in southeastern Province of New York also claimed by the Connecticut Colony. The Oblong was a strip of land approximately 2.9 km wide between Dutchess County, New York, and Connecticut, ceded to New York in the 1731 Treaty of Dover. Between 1720 and 1776 a large number of mostly Connecticut families settled in the southern Oblong. They could not settle west of it because that land was privately owned by the Philipse Family. It had been granted a patent for virtually all of the remainder of the area of the future Putnam County.

The first such settlers in the Oblong were the Hayt family, who built a house at The Elm in 1720. Another early settler was Jacob Haviland, who settled Haviland Hollow in 1731. The first village in Putnam County, the hamlet of Patterson, was originally called Frederickstown. The eastern part of the future Putnam County was called Southeast Precinct (not the same as the current town of Southeast).

Patterson Multi House Compound on 118+ Acres

The Philipses were Loyalists during the Revolution and left the area. The state confiscated their land, selling it off. In 1788, the former Philipse portion of the Oblong was chartered as the Town of Southeast; the remainder of the region was chartered as the Town of Fredericktown. In 1795, Fredericktown township was split into four parts: 1. the Town of Carmel, 2. a part which was combined with the northern half of Southeast and became the Town of Franklin, which was renamed the Town of Patterson in 1808, 3. a part which was combined with the southern half of Southeast and became the new, much larger town of Southeast, and 4. the remnant of the town, which was the Town of Frederick for a while. It was renamed as the Town of Kent in 1817.

  • Price: $4,100,000 
  • County: Putnam 
  • Contact: Margaret Harrington 
  • Cell: (914)572-7395 
  • Brokerage: Douglas Elliman Real Estate 
  • Town: Patterson